Thursday, June 24, 2010

Cormac McCarthy

While on vacation, I decided to take a break from my normal diet of theology and leadership books and instead read a couple of novels (they pass the time way better on an eleven hour plane ride).  One book was All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy (who also wrote The Road and No Country for Old Men).  All the Pretty Horses carries the reader along in a gripping narrative filled with suspense, subtle humor, and profound insight into the human condition.  The pace of the book makes for a quick read, but you might need a Spanish-English dictionary to get through some of the dialogue. If you're looking for some summer reading that will entertain you while at the same time making you think, then grab a copy of All the Pretty Horses.  Some quotes to perk your interest-

"He lay in the dark thinking of all the things he did not know about his father and he realized that the father he knew was all the father he would ever know."
"He said that those who have endured some misfortune will always be set apart but that it is just that misfortune which is their gift and which is their strength and that they must make their way back into the common enterprise of man for without they do so it cannot go forward and they themselves will wither in bitterness."
"...I knew that what I was seeking to discover was a thing I'd always known.  That all courage was a form of constancy.  That i was always himself that the coward abandoned first.  After this all other betrayals came easily."
"I knew that courage came with less struggle for some than for others but I believed that anyone who desired it could have it.  That the desire was the thing itself.  The thing itself.  I could think of nothing else of which that was true." 

2 comments:

Tim said...

Good stuff. I liked The Road, so I'll have to check out this trilogy at some point.

You mention leadership books - any in particular you found helpful and worth recommending?

Christopher said...

I would suggest The Effective Executive and anything by Patrick Lencioni.

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